TopfShow #7: Die Zukunft der Musikindustrie und 5 Wege, um an Musik für seinen Podcast zu kommen. - mrtopf.demrtopf.de

TopfShow #7: Die Zukunft der Musikindustrie und 5 Wege, um an Musik für seinen Podcast zu kommen.

Episode #7 of my german podcast TopfShow is about the problems the music industry is having right now. Be assured that I will also blog about this in english as it’s an important topic. So stay tuned!

[Download mp3, 60:00, 55,2 MB)]

[audio:http://podcasts.plonetv.de/topfshow/topfshow_07_musikindustrie.mp3]

Über diesen Podcast und dessen englischen Bruder

englischer Podcast: TopfCast (iTunes)
deutscher Podcast: TopfShow (iTunes)
Feedback: mrtopf@gmail.com
(gerne auch Feedback als Audio-Kommentar in mp3-Form)

Shownotes

Barcamp Ruhr in Essen
Crowdsourcing für das Musik-Business

Radiohead
Nine Inch Nails – Ghosts
Matthew Ebel
Virtual Hotwings
CD Baby
aktuelle De:Bug-Ausgabe
Kulturflatrate (hier noch ein PDF mit einer Analyse des wissenschaftlichen Dienst des dt. Bundestags)

5 Wege an Musik für seinen Podcast (oder zum Selberhören) zu kommen

  1. PodShow.com und music.podshow.com
  2. IODA Promonet
  3. Jamendo
  4. opsound
  5. Netlabels

Auch gut: byte.fm und FreeQuency, sowie Metawelle, 12rec (Alles so Links vom Barcamp)

Musik

„Underwater Is A Place To Be Alone“
von Biathlon (Eric Adrian Lee) auf Biathlon 2, erschienen bei Eletronic Diversity. (Download album)

„D. Kitt“
von My First Trumpet auf Frerk, erschienen bei Aerotone. (Download)

„Run Quick
von Cuebism auf der „Circle EP“, erschienen auf Ideology. (Download)

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4 Kommentare » Schreibe einen Kommentar

  1. I'm going to comment in English (even though I do understand German, my written grammar is appalling.)
    I just got finished reading Larry Kirwan's book, "Green Suede Shoes". He has been leading the band Black 47 for a long time and has been a musician since a school. With Black 47 he had a brief flirt with fame when they were 'discovered' by the music industry, but despite all the machinery and so-called professionalism, the label totally bungled the marketing and Black 47 remains a moderately successful local New York band but never made a 'killing' that the surely had hoped for. For me it was interesting to see how the music industry works from the band's point of view. An eye-opener is that the bands are getting screwed by the labels in many ways. They get really disadvantageous contracts, they relinquish the rights to their own recordings so that if the label stops producing the CDs, the band can't sustain themselves that way. The Long Tail, as you rightly point out , is not well served by the industry which is focussed on the killing. There might be better books for looking at the music industry, but I thought Larry's book was already quite interesting.

    Having said that, the music industry fulfills a need (or tries to) and that is the need that a lot of us good consumers have in celebrity. Whether or not the music is actually good or not isn't all that important then the possibility of rallying around a celebrity giving yourself a group identity and something to talk about with others. It's hard to imagine (though still possible) a 'Sting' or a 'Madonna' emerging without a very large marketing apparatus.

    As to finding new music, there used to be a few good independent music podcasts and I found a lot of good music that way. However, many of them get harassed by the music industry and are also viewed with suspicion by the bands themselves (I talked to a band once about podcasts) and so they often disappear after a while.

    There have been so many good ideas batted around (and iTunes isn't the worst as the DRM can be easily circumvented) and it would be interesting to see what idea finally emerges.

  2. Thanks for your comment. I also heard it a lot that artists are not particularly well handled by labels (I am not sure if all those artists doing 360° contracts are really that happy). So maybe this is even a chance to change this.

    Regarding finding music it maybe comes down to being allowed playing music without having to do contracts and paying lots of money. Crowdsourcing only can work if the foundation is available.

    In general I think we can conclude that we live in interesting times ;-)